Archive for the ‘National Media Museum’ category

TIMECODE: Jean-Luc Godard’s Sauve la vie (qui peut): A Reconstruction

April 16, 2014

Godard - SLV(QP)2

Michael Witt

‘Jean-Luc Godard’s Sauve la vie (qui peut): A Reconstruction’

 

Wednesday 7 May, Cubby Broccoli Cinema, National Media Museum, 6pm

 

This film is a reconstruction by Michael Witt of a ‘special edition’ of Jean Luc-Godard’s 1980 film Sauve qui peut (la vie) (aka Slow Motion), created by Godard in Rotterdam in 1980. Godard interspersed five extracts from his own film with clips from four other classics. The film has subsequently been almost forgotten but Michael Witt has produced a digital reconstruction drawing on archival research, including examination of the original reels of film that Godard used.

 

Michael Witt is co-director of the Centre for Research in Film and Audiovisual Cultures at University of Roehampton in London. He is co-editor of several books on French film including Jean-Luc Godard: Documents; The French Cinema Book and For Ever Godard. His recent book Jean-Luc Godard, Cinema Historian has been awarded the 2014 Limina Award for the Best International Film Studies Book.

 

The screening will be preceded by a talk by Michael Witt.

 

TO RESERVE A TICKET PLEASE CONTACT DR MARK GOODALL (m.goodall@bradford.ac.uk)

TIMECODE: RICHARD JOBSON

March 6, 2014

richard-jobson

Monday 31 March 2014, 6pm, Action Zone, National Media Museum

Richard Jobson is one of the most fascinating and innovative contemporary British film directors. Jobson began his career as singer with angular New Wave group The Skids. He then became interested in art and formed the experimental rock group The Armoury Show. Jobson became fascinated by the cinematic and made records of poetic/filmic soundscapes for the cult Belgian record label Les Disques Du Crépuscule, inspired by the writings and films of Marguerite Duras. His first feature 16 Years of Alcohol (2003), was a cult hit. Based on his novel of the same name, it told the harrowing story of a violent, dysfunctional upbringing tinged with the hope of redemption.

More recently he has explored the haunting nature of military conflict in The Somnambulists (2012) and the fictional world of the ghost story with A Woman in Winter (2006). In this talk he will discuss his career and his recent experiments with innovative new film technologies.
How to book

Tickets are free but you must book in advance by calling the museum Box Office team 0844 856 3797 or email filmeducation@nationalmediamuseum.org.uk

TIMECODE: The Value of Music

February 13, 2014

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David Hesmondhalgh

The Value of Music: Participation, Sociability and Community

Wednesday 5 March 2014, 6pm, Action Zone, National Media Museum

What contribution can cultural forms such as music make to our lives? Music seems to have especially strong links to sociability and community. But how can we best understand these aspects of music? In what ways can music enhance people’s efforts to flourish together, and what constrains it from doing so? This talk addresses these issues, building on a sympathetic critique of the leading theorists of musical participation.

David Hesmondhalgh is Professor of Media in the Institute of Communications Studies (soon to be renamed School of Media and Communication) at the University of Leeds. He is the author of Why Music Matters (Blackwell, 2013), Creative Labour: Media Work in Three Cultural Industries (Routledge, 2011, co-written with Sarah Baker), and The Cultural Industries, now in its third edition (Sage, 2012). He is also editor or co-editor of five other books. He recently co-edited (with Anamik Saha) a special issue of the journal Popular Communication on ‘Race, Ethnicity and Cultural Production’.

TIMECODE
a seminar series in media

Run by the Communication Culture and Media research group in the School of Media Design and Technology, this regular seminar series explores the increasingly important relationship between media, technology, culture and society.  MDT has a long tradition of operating across artistic and scientific academic disciplines and is expanding its creative portfolio. Hosted by the National Media Museum, and supported by their superb facilities, the series recognises the importance of the National Media Museum as a forum for these critical debates.

All seminars are FREE and begin at 6pm, National Media Museum, Bradford, West Yorkshire, BD1 1NQ. Tel: 0870 70 10 200
http://www.nationalmediamuseum.org.uk/

For more information on the series contact: Mark Goodall
(m.goodall@bradford.ac.uk) Tel +44 (0)1274 236071

http://www.brad.ac.uk/ei/media-design-technology/research/research-centres/communication-culture-media/timecode-seminars/
https://bradccm.wordpress.com/

TIMECODE: Offbeat: Cult British Cinema

October 22, 2013

OFFBEAT_COVER_01_600

‘Offbeat: Cult British Cinema’

Julian Upton

Wednesday 27 November 2013, 6pm, Room at the Top, National Media Museum

While critics sing from an over familiar hymn sheet of so-called ‘cult films,’ there remains an epoch of British cinema still awaiting discovery that is every bit as provocative and deserving of attention. In this illustrated talk Julian Upton discusses his new book Offbeat: British Cinema’s Curiosities, Obscurities and Forgotten Gems (Headpress) which is a passionate, irreverent and informative exploration of British cinema’s secret history, from the buoyant leap in film production in the late fifties to the dying embers of popular domestic cinema in the early eighties.

The talk will be followed by a rare screening of Peter Medak’s The Ruling Class (1972) which Julian will introduce.

Details can be found here:

http://www.nationalmediamuseum.org.uk/films/t/therulingclass.aspx

Julian Upton is the author of the Headpress book Fallen Stars (2004) and has written on film for Filmfax, Bright Lights Film and The Big Picture. He is also a blogger on vintage British cinema at Moviemail.com

TIMECODE
a seminar series in media

Run by the Communication Culture and Media research group in the Bradford Media School, School of Computing Informatics and Media (SCIM), this regular seminar series explores the increasingly
important relationship between media, technology, culture and society.  SCIM has a long tradition of operating across artistic and scientific academic disciplines and is expanding its creative portfolio. Hosted by the National Media Museum, and supported by their superb facilities, the series recognises the importance of the National Media Museum as a forum for these critical debates.

All seminars are FREE and begin at 6pm, On Location, National Media Museum, Bradford, West Yorkshire, BD1 1NQ. Tel: 0870 70 10 200
http://www.nationalmediamuseum.org.uk/

For more information on the series contact: Mark Goodall
(m.goodall@bradford.ac.uk) Tel +44 (0)1274 236071

http://bms.brad.ac.uk/research/timecode.php

HAUNTOLOGY

March 1, 2013

The history of film is now haunted. As the films of the first century disappear, we are left with celluloid ghosts.

HAUNTOLOGY: 20 YEARS ON

Wednesday 17 April, 10am – 5pm, National Media Museum

The spectres of Marx. Why this plural? Would there be more than one of them?” (Jacques Derrida)

‘Hauntology: 20 Years On’ is a one-day symposium organised to mark 20 years since the publication of Jacques Derrida’s ‘Spectres of Marx’. Hauntology defies easy description but embodies the idea of the ‘past inside the present’ and the border between nostalgia and the enigmatic remoteness of real or constructed pasts.

This event is part of the  19th Bradford International Film Festival

http://www.nationalmediamuseum.org.uk/BradfordInternationalFilmFestival.aspx

The keynote speaker will be cultural theorist Mark Fisher, editor of the ‘Capitalist Realism’, the K-Punk blog and author of ‘Ghosts of My Life’ a forthcoming book on hauntology.

Papers include:

The Haunted Remake: Film of the Same Name

The Hallucinatory real of the photograph after the post-continental turn

“‘Maintaining the Spectres’: the Radical Possibilities of Electronic Voice Phenomena Recordings”

Hauntology and the Archive

The symposium will be accompanied by screenings of ‘hauntological’ films including:

DECASIA
Dir. Bill Morrison, USA 2003

SANS SOLEIL
Dir. Chris Marker, France 1983

DREAM OF WILD HORSES
(Le songe des chevaux sauvages)
Dir. Denys Colomb Daunant, France 1960

THE STONE TAPE
Dir. Peter Sasdy, UK 1972

This is a FREE EVENT but with limited places so please reserve a space by contacting Mark Goodall (m.goodall@bradford.ac.uk)

TIMECODE is a seminar series in media. Run by the Communication Culture and Media research group in the Bradford Media School, School of Computing Informatics and Media (SCIM), this regular seminar series explores the increasingly important relationship between media, technology, culture and society.

TIMECODE- ‘Architecture, Media and Politics’

April 16, 2012

Owen Hatherley (Writer and Critic)

‘Architecture, Media and Politics’

Wednesday 25 April 2012, 6pm, On Location, National Media Museum

In Lindsay Anderson’s The White Bus, a vehicle carries middle class passengers around to see the parts of the city they usually ignore – factories, council estates, slums. In post-war cinema, the urban landscape of the North of England was intensely explored, as a place undergoing rapid modernisation and change, from the new housing estates of The White Bus to the technocratic new coffins in Billy Liar. By the 1970s, these had become unpleasant if often thrilling dystopias, in films like Get Carter or The Offence; but by the 1980s, in the likes of A Very British Coup, that same landscape could represent a space of resistance. Today, that space is evoked as ambiguous nostalgia, in the likes of This is England ’86 or Red Riding; but there are few attempts to get to grips with the present urban landscape, and the perhaps equally drastic redevelopments of the last decade. This talk will consider a few examples and pose the question of why the contemporary architecture of the UK seems so unappealing for filmmakers.

Owen Hatherley is a regular contributor to Building Design, New Statesman and New Humanist and has also written for The Guardian, Icon, Socialist Worker and Socialist Review. His book A Guide to the New Ruins of Great Britain was published by Verso in 2010.

Media and Conflict Interchange 2011

September 5, 2011

This October, we are screening five factual and fictional films, at the Pictureville cinema in the National Media Museum.  Introduced by expert speakers, including Paul Rogers, author of ‘Why We’re Losing the War on Terror’, the Interchange will be lively and highly entertaining, but with a very serious focus, and offers a chance to debate the meanings and impacts of important media texts.

The first day is themed ‘Arab Spring’ with Battle of Algiers bringing much needed historical context and Arna’s Children and Restrepo, documenting aspects of struggle in Palestine and Afghanistan.  The second day features The March (1990 – BBC) – a dramatisation of mass migration caused by climate change and arguably Oliver Stone’s best film – Salvador.

There is an opportunity to see further screenings and take part in an extended debate at The University on the Thursday after the event.  More details of this will be posted shortly, but do get in touch if you’re interested in contributing to the Thursday workshop.

Tue 25th October

Film: Arna’s Children

Time: 12:25

Film: The Battle of Algiers

Time: 14:50

Film: Restrepo

Time:17:50


Weds 26th October

Film: Salvador

Time: 14:30

Film:The March

Time: 17:30

Thu 27th October

A series of talks and discussions at The University, hosted by CCM – all free – come and get involved!

The screenings and talks are free to Bradford University students and staff, others pay the normal cinema charge (except for the Thursday which is entirely free).  This event is organised by CCM’s own David Robison, based in Bradford Media School, with collaborators from Peace Studies and The National Media Museum.

See the Media and Conflict website (www.mediaandconflict.org.uk) for details.  E-mail info@mediaandconflict.org.uk.  Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/group.php?gid=182684996689