Archive for November 2011

What is a Film School For?

November 14, 2011

What is a Film School For?.

Date: 05-December-2011
Time: 18:00
Location: On Location, National Media Museum
Speaker: Duncan Petrie

Synopsis

Over the last decade, the education and training of practitioners in film and television in the UK has been dominated by a skills agenda embodied by Skillset/UKFC training strategy ‘A Bigger Future’ which was initiated in 2003. Whatever the pros and cons of the strategy, it paid no attention to the historical role and contribution made by films schools in the UK and elsewhere, a context that arguably could have informed the policy in quite useful ways.
In this presentation Duncan Petrie will attempt to identify elements of that missing context by considering the development and role of some of the more high profile films schools in Britain, notably the National Film and Television School, the London Film School and the Royal College of Art.

Professor Duncan Petrie has authored six books including The British Cinematographer (BFI, 1996), Screening Scotland (BFI, 2000) and Shot in New Zealand (Random House, 2007). He has also edited many books, most recently The Cinema of Small Nations (Edinburgh University Press, 2007), co-edited by Mette Hjort. He is co-principal editor of the Journal of the British Cinema and Television and is a member of the editorial board of Studies in Australasian Cinema.

Timecode: Visual Regimes

November 2, 2011

Visual Regimes: from where come the pressures on a knowledge-relation to the world?


Date: 02-November-2011
Time: 18:00
Location: On Location, National Media Museum
Speaker: Robert Galeta

This seminar will look at visual hierarchies from the middle ages to the change with the high renaissance and the next change with high modernism, all related to the contribution of visual form to knowledge and understanding. The talk will include a discussion of Jean-Luc Godard’s auto-cinebiography JLG par JLG as an example of the centrifugal or dispersive legacy of modernist collage.

Robert Galeta is a theoretician, artist and translator who worked on the English version of Gilles Deleuze’s Cinema 2. He currently teaches on the MA Visual Arts course at Bradford College.